New ‘Pluralist’ Initiative Aims to Expand Availability of Organ Donations

A new initiative from UC Davis Health hopes to create better availability for organ donation and life-saving surgeries across California. The program aims to create a better understanding and accessibility to organ donation and transplants, regardless of socio-economic status. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, communities of color have much higher rates of high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and disease — all of which increase the risk of kidney disease. African Americans are almost four times more likely and Latinos are 1.3 times more likely to have kidney failure. And despite the higher risk, data shows that patients on dialysis are less likely to be placed on the transplant waiting list and therefore less likely to get the life-saving help they need. many patients who die who are not able to receive an organ,” said Martin Cadeiras, UC Davis Health MD “It’s about how we work with the community, how we work with patients said Cadeiras. highlight the need for better education about organ donation and funding. The program is expected to reach more than 22 million Californians over 2 years – 70% of whom are from targeted racial and ethnic minorities, low-income groups and residents of rural areas. Many members of our historically underserved communities are less likely to be placed on transplant waiting lists and have had a lower likelihood of transplant. This initiative will help identify potential system-wide improvements that would increase organ donation and promote equity in organ donation and transplantation,” said David Lubarsky, CEO of UC Davis Health.

A new initiative from UC Davis Health hopes to create better availability for organ donation and life-saving surgeries across California.

The new initiative is called “Pluralist” for precision patient-centered digital health education. The program aims to create a better understanding and accessibility to organ donation and transplantation, regardless of socio-economic status.

According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, communities of color have much higher rates of high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and heart disease — all of which increase the risk of kidney disease.

African Americans are almost four times more likely and Latinos are 1.3 times more likely to have kidney failure. And despite the higher risk, data shows that patients on dialysis are less likely to be placed on the transplant waiting list and therefore less likely to get the life-saving help they need.

“There is a major need for organ donors, there are many patients dying who cannot receive an organ,” said Martin Cadeiras, UC Davis Health MD.

“It’s about how we work with the community, how we work with patients,” Cadeiras said.

US doctors at Davis Health stress the need for better education about organ donation and funding.

The program is estimated to reach more than 22 million Californians over 2 years – 70% of whom are from targeted racial and ethnic minorities, low-income groups and residents of rural areas.

“Many members of our historically underserved communities are less likely to be placed on transplant waiting lists and have had a lower likelihood of transplant. This initiative will help identify potential system-wide improvements that would increase organ donation and promote equity in organ donation and transplantation,” said David Lubarsky, CEO of UC Davis Health.


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